Gerlinde Wernig Laboratory

“Wohin die Luft der Freiheit weht”

Gerlinde Wernig Laboratory

“Wohin die Luft der Freiheit weht”
“Wohin die Luft der Freiheit weht”

Research

Our mission

Fibrotic diseases is a cover term coined by our laboratory to address complications of the excessive scarring of fibrous tissue. They occur when fibroblasts – a critical component of the structural tissue of the body – proliferate and include, but are not limited to lung fibrosis, kidney and liver fibrosis, scleroderma, wound healing and surgical adhesions. Despite fibrotic diseases being life-threatening-- the mortality rate of some are higher than that of cancer-- current treatments are ineffective and/or entirely nonexistent.  

Our mission is to identify new targets for treatment through uncovering the underlying mechanisms of fibrosis. We seek to understand how fibroblasts crosstalk with one another, with the immune system, and with epithelial and mesenchymal cells. By utilizing mass cytometry, gene expression and chromatin studies of patient-derived primary tissues in combination with in vivo modeling of fibrotic disease in mice, we gain insight into the pathophysiology of fibrotic diseases. We employ immunotherapy combined with small molecules in order to manipulate signaling pathways at the transcriptional level to disrupt pro-fibrotic cell function and fate. The transcriptional networks we study play key roles in fibrotic disease, metabolism, bone physiology, cancer, and immunology. Understanding them will provide the critical foundation to translate our findings into immunotherapies and clinical practice.

Publications

2020
Expansion of Bone Precursors through Jun as a Novel Treatment for Osteoporosis-Associated Fractures.
Stem Cell Reports
Lerbs T, Cui L, Muscat C, Saleem A, van Neste C, Domizi P, Chan C, Wernig G
View abstract
Pubmed link
2020
Activation of JUN in fibroblasts promotes pro-fibrotic programme and modulates protective immunity.
Nat Commun
Cui L, Chen SY, Lerbs T, Lee JW, Domizi P, Gordon S, Kim YH, Nolan G, Betancur P, Wernig G
View abstract
Pubmed link
2020
Elucidating the fundamental fibrotic processes driving abdominal adhesion formation.
Nat Commun
Foster DS, Marshall CD, Gulati GS, Chinta MS, Nguyen A, Salhotra A, Jones RE, Burcham A, Lerbs T, Cui L, King ME, Titan AL, Ransom RC, Manjunath A, Hu MS, Blackshear CP, Mascharak S, Moore AL, Norton JA, Kin CJ, Shelton AA, Januszyk M, Gurtner GC, Wernig G, Longaker MT
View abstract
Pubmed link
2020
CD47 prevents the elimination of diseased fibroblasts in scleroderma.
JCI Insight
Lerbs T, Cui L, King ME, Chai T, Muscat C, Chung L, Brown R, Rieger K, Shibata T, Wernig G
View abstract
Pubmed link

News

The latest stories from Gerlinde Wernig and the team
June 6, 2020
Immunotherapy: A new hope for lung fibrosis?

Idiopathic lung fibrosis is a debilitating disease with a dismal prognosis and which is currently is incurable. The disease is caused by progressive scarring in the lungs, making it difficult to breathe for patients who become dependent on oxygen to live. Now a team of researchers led by assistant professor of pathology Gerlinde Wernig, MD, at the Stanford Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine has shown that scar tissue cells called fibroblasts are able to proliferate by avoiding immune surveillance, and that a cure may lie in reactivating that immune function.  Their work was published online in the journal Nature Communications on June 3, 2020.

Read more
December 13, 2018
Fibrosis reversed when 'don't eat me' signal blocked

We identified a pathway that, when mutated, drives fibrosis in many organs of the body. The pathway underlies what have been considered somewhat disparate conditions, including scleroderma, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, liver cirrhosis, kidney fibrosis and more. These diseases are often incurable and life-threatening.

Read more
November 21, 2018
Investigational Anti-cancer Treatment Found to Reverse Fibrosis in Mice

Coverage in Scleroderma News of our work to identify a key element that is responsible for fibrosis of many incurable and life-threatening diseases, such as scleroderma. The finding helps to develop new specific and efficient treatments to reverse tissue fibrosis processes

Read more
November 21, 2018
We find that it is possible to reverse fibrosis

WorldHealth.net covered our work to determine that it is possible to reverse fibrosis. We found that fibrotic diseases that occur in humans are united with a common signaling pathway. The research team determined that the antibody anti-CD47 reverses fibrosis in mice. Anti-CD47 is currently being tested as an anti cancer agent.

Read more
December 13, 2018
2018 Awards

• Elected to Member of the Institute for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at Stanford

• Ludwig Investigator award

• Boehringer-Ingelheim Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis Investigator award

• K08 award, National Institute of Health, NHLBI

• Scleroderma research foundation, Young investigator award

• Desmoid tumor research foundation, Young investigator award


Read more
December 20, 2018
Leukemia drug enters clinical trials

Just three years after discovering a genetic mutation that causes a trio of leukemias, we helped move a new leukemia drug into clinical trials. As part of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), our drug which is based on strong preclinical data has been approved by the FDA for human trials. Our tests in mince populations showed that the drug eliminates clinical manifestation of the leukemias without significant toxicity.

Read more
December 20, 2018
Dialing a bespoke signal

Exploring the fundamental mechanism by which a cell-surface receptor transmits its signal, our team of Ludwig researchers and our colleagues has established proof of concept for an entirely new approach to drug design. Wereport that a class of synthetic molecules known as diabodies can, from outside the cell, latch onto a target receptor and manipulate it in such a manner as to induce distinct and varying effects within cells and tissues. In lab experiments how this might work, using a diabody to stall the growth of cancer cells isolated from patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms.

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People

Members of our lab come from all walks of life...

Gerlinde Wernig

MD, Principal Investigator

Gerlinde is a pathologist by trade whose research centers around the mechanisms of fibrosis and new treatments. She enjoys staying active by hiking in the mountains and sprinting between clinic and lab. She finds optimizing complex lab protocols as gratifying as perfecting the recipes in her side-gig as an undercover chef.

Team

Lui Cui

PHD, senior scientist

Lu’s current research in focusing on the immune modulatory mechanisms in fibrosing conditions and the potential immunotherapy on fibrosis disease. She normally has a lot of different projects on her plate, but she tackles them without hesitation. Also found on her plate are the aromatic home-cooked meals she brings for lunch everyday that make other members hungry before their own lunch break. Her source of energy is hiking every other week with her family.

Tristan Lerbs

MD, post-doc

Having once dreamt of becoming a pilot and a soccer player, Tristan instead found his calling in medicine. He is studying the effects of transcriptional programs on osteopenia. In his free time (he has none), he enjoys musicals and going to the opera. He manages to sneak in tennis and gym sessions in between incubation periods, and his role model is Mark Wahlberg from Pain & Gain.

Megan King

CIRM student

Megan King is our fantastic CIRM student who joined our team of fibrosis researchers a little less than a year ago. She will be applying to medical school soon, but in the meantime is interested in uncovering immune metabolism and JUN mediated pathologic signaling in desmoid tumors.

Cristabelle De Souza

PhD, post-doc

Cristabelle De Souza is a recent addition to our lab from UC Davis Medical Center. Armed with a Ph.D. in Cancer Biology she joins our team as a researcher steering our investigations into fibrotic research further. A classic type A personality, she constantly likes to be on the move. In addition to science and medicine, she is trained in latin american dancing and plays the guitar which keeps research frustrations at bay. She also likes to live life on the edge and takes part in adventure sports. Cristabelle says she is a terrible cook and is always looking up seminars that provide free lunch!

Qiwen Deng

Lab member

Qiwen Deng loves science and research, she is interested to study innate immunity and fibrosis in disease. When she is not working in the lab (which is almost never) she enjoys reading, fine art and good food and playing pool with friends.


Atif Saleem

Fellow

Atif Saleem is currently a Hematopathology fellow at Stanford and will be a Dermatopathology fellow here next year: this mélange of interests makes him enthusiastic and grateful to be in the Wernig lab. He is interested in patho mechanisms of GVHD driving fibrosis, in addition interested in effects of viruses on the immune repertoire and disease. Outside the lab, you can find him getting injured snowboarding or probably jet-lagged given his interest of global health.


Alumni

Tyler Shibata

Stanford Undergraduate

Prospective major in Chemistry, biological chemistry track

Jessica Lee

Stanford Undergraduate

Prospective major in Biology

Claire Muscat

Stanford Undergraduate

Prospective major in Bioengineering

Camille van Neste

MD, PhD candidate

After she had graduated from college at Stanford, Camille was working on mechanism of fibrosis in the lab. She decided  to pursue a career as a physician-scientist and is now an MD and Phd candidate at Mount Sinai Medical School, NY.

Yong-hun Kim

Mayo Clinic Medical School

Yong-hun has majored from computer science with a focus in biocomputation. During his undergraduate years he helped with studies to develop immune therapies as a treatment for lung fibrosis in our lab. Yong-hun recently graduated and received his master in computer science from Stanford. Yong-hun was accepted into Mayo Clinic Medical School and will start his medical training in fall 2020.

Alexa Vu

Undergraduate student University of Arizona

A cactus hailing from the dusty town of Tucson, Alexa is a summer student majoring in Molecular and Cellular Biology. Despite her nitrile allergy, she enjoys being in lab where she aims to better understand transcriptional factors of bone development. When she is not in the imaging room, Alexa is taking pictures of her food and embarrassing the people with her.

Consultation

Hematopathology consults can be sent to the admin address listed in our contact section. Please include a coversheet and the requisition form provided here.

Partnerships

Current projects and collaborations in the lab

Wound healing – collaboration with Dr. Longaker lab
Chronic Graft-versus Host Disease – collaboration with Dr. Shizuru lab
Lung fibrosis – collaboration with Dr. Desai lab
Scleroderma – Drs. Howard Chang lab, Lori Chung
Eye: Hyperthyroidism, cGVHD, IgG4 disease – collaboration with Dr. Wu lab
Fibrotic tumors/Desmoids - collaboration with Drs. van de Rijn lab/Kumar
Tumor stroma – collaboration with Dr. Plevritis lab
Metabolism and immunity – collaboration with Dr. Weissman lab
Small molecules with antifibrotic properties – collaboration with Dr. Malhotra lab
cJUN drives expansion of bone stem and progenitors – collaboration with Dr. Charles Chan lab

Contact

We are always excited to hear from talented scientists and potential collaborators

Contact Gerlinde Wernig on
gwernig@stanford.edu

Address:
Stanford University School of Medicine,
Institute for Regenerative Medicine & Stem Cell Research,
265 Campus Drive,
Stanford,
CA 94305 - 5461,
U.S.A.

Contact

We are always open to collaboration and interested to hear from talent candidates.

Address:
Stanford University School of Medicine,
Institute for Regenerative Medicine & Stem Cell Research,
265 Campus Drive,
Stanford,
CA 94305 - 5461,
U.S.A.


Contact Gerlinde Wernig on
gwernig@stanford.edu

Or please reach out through her admin, Cevan Smith:
Tel: 650-725-4917
Fax- 650-736-2961
E: csmitty@stanford.edu

Donations

Support of our work from donors and patrons is much appreciated! If you would like to make a donation to the lab, the best way to give is via the Stanford Pathology portal here.

Consultation

Hematopathology consults can be sent to the admin address listed in our contact section. Please include a coversheet and the requisition form provided here.